Because I love music, a lot of musicians end up in my novels. In MARIACHI MURDER, Andy Veracruz is a band leader in Southern California… until he really gets into trouble!

Posts tagged ‘southern arizona symphony orchestra’

Rossini and Verdi Rock the Opera Festival in Oaxaca, Mexico

Last weekend I had the immense pleasure of playing for the opera festival in Oaxaca, Mexico. It came about because orchestra conductor Linus Lerner, Maribel Sánchez, and their cohorts had the grand idea to bring young singers to Oaxaca. Linus and Maribel collected soloists, chorus members, orchestra members, and even dancers to put on a supreme show. Sponsors from SASO helped fund the gala event.

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The soloists were from all over Mexico. They included Jorge Jiménez from Guadalajara singing Ponchielli’s “Cielo y mar” and Gabriel Navarro from Mexico City singing Wagner’s “Abendstern.” We performed 32 pieces altogether, starting with an overture from “La forza del destino.”

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We had a wonderful combination of pieces written by composers ranging from Vivaldi to Verdi. Hits included Donizetti’s “Quel guardo il cavaliere” and the Anvil song (Gypsy song) from Il Trovatore. The singers performed in Italian, French, and German. Many of the pieces were solos. Others were duets. In the case of “Si ritrovarla io giuro” the soloist claimed he would find Cinderella while his attendants swore to help him!

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We performed our first concert in the Teatro Macedonio Alcalá. The event was free, but seating was limited. When we arrived, there was a line that stretched all the way around the block! We performed for an exceedingly attentive audience who didn’t seem to mind that we had such a long program! Instead they wanted more. After we played the “Brindisi” from La Traviata, they wouldn’t let us go home! We had to perform it again.

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We had a chance to perform the concert on Sunday as well, this time at Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de las Nieves. (The priests kindly let us use their church at the last minute.) This was a smaller venue, so it was more intimate. Because the church had wonderful acoustics, opera music went sailing through the streets.

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The festival came after a week of long rehearsals for the musicians from the Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra from Tucson combined with local musicians. Saturday we had a six-hour rehearsal! But our efforts were well rewarded. We’re already happy about the prospects of coming back again next year.

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Naturally, the parties afterwards were pretty good too!

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Photos compliments of Jorge Jimenez and Maribel Sanchez

D.R. Ransdell is a Tucson-based novelist. To read about her series featuring a totally different kind of musician, mariachi violinist Andy Veracruz, please see http://www.drransdellnovels.com

Andy’s first adventure is titled MARIACHI MURDER.

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Why I Love Mariachi #2 Classical Differences

I love mariachi music because it’s immediate. When you’re playing for an audience, you’re usually right there next to them. Once in a while you might be on stage, but at any rate, you’re still close by. That makes the music more vibrant, more exciting, more alive. As a performer it’s wonderful because you constantly make eye contact with your audience either to let them know you empathize or that you’re joking or that you’re simply checking in to make their experience the best one possible.

This is in complete contrast to classical music. Last month I had a chance to hear the Tucson Symphony Orchestra concert. Steven Moeckel played John Corigliano’s concerto “The Red Violin,” and because he’s Steven Moeckel, he played it really, really well.

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I could see him perfectly because I was sitting in the third row. I couldn’t see the oboes or the trumpets, but I didn’t care. As a violin player, I’m biased. During an orchestra concert, I want to keep my eyes on the violins.

I watched in awe as Steven played harmonics and double stops. He played sustained notes with graceful vibrato and crunched through passages played for effect. Because I happened to be sitting close to him, I could see his expressions and feel his triumph as he crashed through difficult passages that were high and fast and loud.

But as he performed, most of the audience was completely removed from him. (He and the conductor did give a half-hour talk before the performance, however.) The regular concert-goer wouldn’t have left the theatre with any sense of Steven the man behind the violin.

This is a shame. The reason I wanted to hear this concert was not merely because I knew the violin playing would be top-notch or that the symphony members would do a wonderful job with Mahler #5. I wanted to hear Steven in concert because a few years ago when I started back up with the Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra, Steven performed with us. I got to meet him and talk to him in person. And that’s how I found out he’s a tremendously nice guy. Never mind that he’s played concerts all over Europe, never mind that he’s been concertmaster of both TSO and the Phoenix Symphony Orchestra. He’s there for all of us.
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As I heard him perform tonight, I was well aware of that. I felt bad for the audience members who only knew about him through the biography in the program and hearing the notes he played on stage. He’s much more than that, but in classical music, the audience is almost always a distant concept. They’re specks of dust on the horizon or drops of rain in a storm. They’re far away.

What I’d really like to see is Steven Moeckel playing up close and personal in a mariachi band. Now that would be worth seeing every night of the week.

For more on mariachi and my new novel MARIACHI MURDER, please visit http://www.drransdellnovels.com.